Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Arachnoid Cysts


Synonyms of Arachnoid Cysts
  • Cysts, Arachnoid

Disorder Subdivisions

  • Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts
  • Spinal Arachnoid Cysts


General Discussion
Arachnoid cysts are fluid-filled sacs that occur on the arachnoid membrane that covers the brain (intracranial) and the spinal cord (spinal). There are three membranes covering these components of the central nervous system: dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater. Arachnoid cysts appear on the arachnoid membrane, and they may also expand into the space between the pia mater and arachnoid membranes (subarachnoid space). The most common locations for intracranial arachnoid cysts are the middle fossa (near the temporal lobe), the suprasellar region (near the third ventricle) and the posterior fossa, which contains the cerebellum, pons, and medulla oblongata.

In many cases, arachnoid cysts do not cause symptoms (asymptomatic). In cases in which symptoms occur, headaches, seizures and abnormal accumulation of excessive cerebrospinal fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus) are common. The exact cause of arachnoid cysts is unknown.

Arachnoid cysts are classified according to location.

Organizations related to Arachnoid Cysts
  • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
    150 Custer Court
    Green Bay WI 54301-1243
    Phone #: 920-336-5333
    800 #: 877-336-5333
    e-mail: mums@netnet.net
    Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
    31 Center Drive
    Bethesda MD 20892-2540
    Phone #: 301-496-5751
    800 #: 800-352-9424
    e-mail: braininfo@ninds.nih.gov
    Home page: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html