Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome


Synonyms of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
  • aHUS
  • Familial Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome
  • Hereditary Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is an extremely rare disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) and acute renal failure. It is a distinctly different illness from hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by particular strains of the bacterium E.coli producing Shiga toxins, most frequently 0157:h7 strain (Stx HUS). While Stx HUS typically is preceded by a gastroenteritis and is associated with infection by Shiga toxin producing-E. coli, there is substantial evidence that aHUS is a genetic disorder.

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome may become a chronic condition, and patients with aHUS may experience repeated attacks of the disorder. When children with Stx HUS recover from the life-threatening initial episode, they are likely to respond well to supportive treatment and to make a good recovery. Children with aHUS are much more likely to develop chronic serious complications such as kidney failure and severe high blood pressure.

    Organizations related to Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
    • American Kidney Fund, Inc.
      6110 Executive Boulevard
      Rockville MD 20852
      Phone #: 301-881-3052
      800 #: 800-638-8299
      e-mail: helpline@kideyfund.org
      Home page: http://www.kidneyfund.org
    • Foundation for Children with Atypical HUS
      7018 Forest Oak Drive
      Barnhart MO 63012
      Phone #: 636-942-4425
      800 #: --
      e-mail: bbiermann@premier-ks.com
      Home page: http://www.atypicalhus.org
    • National Kidney Foundation
      30 East 33rd Street
      New York NY 10016
      Phone #: 212-889-2210
      800 #: 800-622-9010
      e-mail: info@kidney.org
      Home page: http://www.kidney.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html