Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome


Synonyms of Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome
  • Allergic Granulomatous Angiitis of Cronkhite-Canada
  • Canada-Cronkhite Disease
  • CCD
  • Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome
  • Gastrointestinal Polyposis and Ectodermal Changes
  • Polyposis, Skin Pigmentation, Alopecia, and Fingernail Changes

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a very rare disease with symptoms that include loss of taste, intestinal polyps, hair loss, and nail growth problems. It is difficult to treat because of malabsorption that accompanies the polyps. CCS occurs primarily in older people (the average age is 59) and it is not believed to have a genetic component. There have been fewer than 400 cases reported in the past 50 years, primarily in Japan but also in the U.S. and other countries.

    Organizations related to Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome
    • Intestinal Multiple Polyposis and Colorectal Cancer Registry
      P.O. Box 11
      Conyngham PA 18219
      Phone #: 717-788-3712
      800 #: --
      e-mail: user291524@aol.com
      Home page: N/A
    • Madisons Foundation
      PO Box 241956
      Los Angeles CA 90024
      Phone #: 310-264-0826
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
      Home page: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org
    • NIH/National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      2 Information Way
      Bethesda MD 20892-3570
      Phone #: 301-654-3810
      800 #: 800-891-5389
      e-mail: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niddk.nih.gov



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html