Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Erysipelas


Synonyms of Erysipelas
  • Cellulitis
  • Saint Anthony's Fire

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Erysipelas is an infection of the upper layers of the skin (superficial). The most common cause is group A streptococcal bacteria, especially Streptococcus pyogenes. Erysipelas results in a fiery red rash with raised edges that can easily be distinguished from the skin around it. The affected skin may be warm to the touch. At one time, erysipelas was thought to affect mostly the face, but recent studies suggest that the distribution of the inflammation is changing since at the present time the legs are involved in almost 80% of cases. The rash may also appear on the arms or trunk.

    Erysipelas begins with minor trauma, such as a bruise, burn, wound, or incision. When the rash appears on the trunk, arms, or legs, it is usually at the site of a surgical incision or a wound.

    Organizations related to Erysipelas
    • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
      611 East Wells Street
      Milwaukee WI 53202
      Phone #: 414-272-6071
      800 #: 800-822-2762
      e-mail: info@aaaai.org
      Home page: http://www.aaaai.org
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      1600 Clifton Road NE
      Atlanta GA 30333
      Phone #: 404-639-3534
      800 #: 800-311-3435
      e-mail: http://www.cdc.gov/netinfo.htm
      Home page: http://www.cdc.gov/
    • NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      6610 Rockledge Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-6612
      Phone #: 301-496-5717
      800 #: --
      e-mail: N/A
      Home page: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html