Diseases & Conditions


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Gastritis, Giant Hypertrophic


Synonyms of Gastritis, Giant Hypertrophic
  • Gastroenteropathy, Protein Losing
  • Giant Hypertrophy of the Gastric Mucosa
  • Hypertrophic Gastropathy

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Giant hypertrophic gastritis (GHG) is a general term for inflammation of the stomach due to the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the inner wall (mucosa) of the stomach resulting in abnormally large, coiled ridges or folds that resemble polyps in the inner wall of the stomach (hypertrophic gastric folds). GHG encompasses a collection of disorders. The symptoms of GHG may vary from case to case. The exact cause of GHG is unknown.

    There is considerable confusion and contradiction in the medical literature regarding disorders involving large gastric folds. GHG is often used as a synonym for Menetrier disease. However, Menetrier disease is not a true form of gastritis. A diagnosis of Menetrier disease should indicate massive overgrowth of mucous cells (foveola) in the gastric mucosa (foveolar hyperplasia) and minimal inflammation. Foveolar hyperplasia results in large gastric folds. Because inflammation is minimal, Menetrier disease is classified as a form of hyperplastic gastropathy and not a form of gastritis. Some researchers believe that GHG and Menetrier disease may be variants of the same disorder or different parts of one disease spectrum.

    Organizations related to Gastritis, Giant Hypertrophic
    • CORE
      3 St. Andrews Place
      London None NW1 4LB
      Phone #: 020- 74-86 0341
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: info@corecharity.org.uk
      Home page: http://www.corecharity.org.uk
    • NIH/National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      2 Information Way
      Bethesda MD 20892-3570
      Phone #: 301-654-3810
      800 #: 800-891-5389
      e-mail: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niddk.nih.gov



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html