Diseases & Conditions


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Hageman Factor Deficiency


Synonyms of Hageman Factor Deficiency
  • Factor XII Deficiency
  • HAF Deficiency
  • Hageman Trait

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Hageman factor deficiency, also known as factor XII deficiency, is a rare genetic blood disorder that causes prolonged clotting (coagulation) of blood in a test tube without the presence of prolonged clinical bleeding tendencies. It is caused by a deficiency of the Hageman factor (factor XII), a plasma protein (glycoprotein). Although it is thought that factor XII is needed for blood clotting, when it is deficient, other blood clotting factors tend to compensate for its absence. This disorder is thought to be benign and usually presents no symptoms (asymptomatic); it is usually only accidentally discovered through pre-operative blood tests that are required by hospitals. Of substantial recent interest is the role of antibodies to Factor XII in recurrent pregnancy losses.
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    Organizations related to Hageman Factor Deficiency
    • Canadian Hemophilia Society
      625 President Kennedy
      Quebec None H3A 1K2
      Phone #: 514-848-0503
      800 #: 800-668-2686
      e-mail: chs@hemophilia.ca
      Home page: http://www.hemophilia.ca
    • Madisons Foundation
      PO Box 241956
      Los Angeles CA 90024
      Phone #: 310-264-0826
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
      Home page: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org
    • NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Information Center
      P.O. Box 30105
      Bethesda MD 20824-0105
      Phone #: 301-592-8573
      800 #: --
      e-mail: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
      Home page: N/A
    • National Hemophilia Foundation
      116 West 32nd Street
      New York NY 10001
      Phone #: 212-328-3737
      800 #: 800-424-2634
      e-mail: gwidlundDhemophilia.org
      Home page: http://www.hemophilia.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html