Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Hiccups, Chronic


Synonyms of Hiccups, Chronic
  • Hiccough, Chronic
  • Hiccups, Persistent
  • Intractable Hiccups
  • Singultus, Intractable

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    A hiccup is an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the muscle at the base of the lungs (diaphragm) followed by the rapid closure of the vocal cords. Usually, hiccups last for a few hours or, occasionally, a day or two. However, chronic hiccups are ones that continue for an extended period of time. Episodes that last for more than two days and less than a month are sometimes called persistent hiccups. On rare occasions, hiccups persist even longer than a month or recur frequently over an extended period of time. The longest recorded episode of these chronic hiccups lasted 60 years.

    Sometimes, although not always, hiccups that persist may indicate the presence of another medical problem. Some illnesses for which continuing hiccups may be a symptom include: pleurisy of the diaphragm, pneumonia, uremia, alcoholism, disorders of the stomach or esophagus, and bowel diseases. Hiccups may also be associated with pancreatitis, pregnancy, bladder irritation, liver cancer or hepatitis. Surgery, tumors, and lesions may also cause persistent hiccups.

    Organizations related to Hiccups, Chronic
    • NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Information Center
      P.O. Box 30105
      Bethesda MD 20824-0105
      Phone #: 301-592-8573
      800 #: --
      e-mail: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
      Home page: N/A



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html