Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

HTLV Type I and Type II


Synonyms of HTLV Type I and Type II
  • Acute T-Cell Leukemia
  • Acute T-Cell Lymphoma
  • ATL
  • HAM/TSP
  • HTLV-I associated myelopathy
  • Tropical Spastic Paraparesis

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    HTLV-I was first isolated in 1980 from a patient originally thought to have a cutaneous lymphoma. It became clear that it was a distinct form of lymphoma, which was designated as acute T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma (ATL). Some years later, different groups in Martinique and Japan described an association between a chronic disease of the spinal cord and HTLV-I infection, which was later named HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Since then, several other conditions have been linked to HTLV infection.

    It is estimated that between 10 and 20 million people are infected by HTLV-I in the world. Only 0.25-2% of the infected individuals will develop a progressive neurologic disease named HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Approximately 2-5% of HTLV-I carriers will develop ATL. More rarely, HTLV-I may lead to arthropathy, uveitis (inflammation of the eye), pneumonitis and thyroid problems. Areas of the world that are endemic to the HTLV-1 virus are the Caribbean, southern Japan, equatorial Africa, Middle East, South America, and Melanesia.

    Organizations related to HTLV Type I and Type II
    • Transverse Myelitis Association
      1787 Sutter Parkway
      Powell OH 43065-8806
      Phone #: 614-766-1806
      800 #: --
      e-mail: ssiegel@myelitis.org
      Home page: http://www.myelitis.org
    • WE MOVE (Worldwide Education and Awareness for Movement Disorders)
      204 West 84th Street
      New York NY 10024
      Phone #: 212-875-8312
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: wemove@wemove.org
      Home page: http://www.wemove.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html