Diseases & Conditions


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Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis


A type of ARTHRITIS linked to PSORIASIS. While the chronic rash of psoriasis is a common skin condition, only about 12 to 14 percent of people with psoriasis will develop related arthritis. Causes Genetic and environmental factors play a strong role in the development of psoriatic arthritis. A family history of psoriasis is linked to many children with juvenile psoriatic arthritis, as well as a family history of other forms of spondyloarthropathy, but there is little relationship between the severity of a rash and the risk of getting juvenile psoriatic arthritis. Symptoms Symptoms include pitting or thickening and yellowing of the fingernails and toenails, a small round scaly patch on the scalp, belly button, or buttocks; joint problems in large joints such as the hip, either on just one side or in the same joints on both sides of the body; swelling of fingers or toes. Because eye inflammation occurs in between 10 and 20 percent of cases, children with juvenile psoriatic arthritis should be examined by an ophthalmologist annually to check for eye problems. Diagnosis Juvenile psoriatic arthritis can be tricky to diagnose. In some children with the condition, symptoms of arthritis appear before the rash. In these cases, diagnosis can be so difficult that it may take up to 10 years to be certain of a definite diagnosis. Complications While many children have no long-term consequences of juvenile psoriatic arthritis, there are a number of possible complications, including eye problems; decreased range of joint motion; shortening or lengthening of a limb, finger, or toe; damaged cartilage; or enlargement of a joint.