Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Microvillus Inclusion Disease


Synonyms of Microvillus Inclusion Disease
  • Congenital Familial Protracted Diarrhea
  • Congenital Microvillus Atrophy
  • Davidson's Disease
  • Familial Enteropathy, Microvillus

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Microvillus inclusion disease is an extremely rare inherited intestinal disorder (enteropathy) that is typically apparent within hours or days after birth. The disorder is characterized by chronic, severe, watery diarrhea and insufficient absorption (malabsorption) of necessary nutrients due to incomplete development (hypoplasia) and/or degeneration (atrophy) of certain cells of the wall of the small intestine (e.g., hypoplastic villus atrophy, defective brush-border assembly and differentiation). In infants with microvillus inclusion disease, chronic diarrhea and malabsorption may result in severe dehydration, deficiency of necessary nutrients (malnutrition), a failure to grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive), and/or disturbance of the body?s balance of acids and bases, which is essential in regulating the body?s composition of bodily fluids (acidosis). Microvillus inclusion disease is inherited as an autosomal recessive genetic trait.
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    Organizations related to Microvillus Inclusion Disease
    • March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
      1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
      White Plains NY 10605
      Phone #: 914-428-7100
      800 #: 888-663-4637
      e-mail: Askus@marchofdimes.com
      Home page: http://www.marchofdimes.com
    • NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
      Endocrine Diseases Metabolic Diseases Branch
      Bethesda MD 20892-3570
      Phone #: 301-654-3810
      800 #: --
      e-mail: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niddk.nih.gov



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html