Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis


Synonyms of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
  • Alveolar Lipoproteinosis
  • PAP
  • Phospholipidosis

Disorder Subdivisions

  • Congenital Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
  • Idiopathic Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
  • Secondary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis


General Discussion
Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disorder characterized by the accumulation of grainy material consisting mostly of protein and fat (lipoproteinaceous material) in the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli). Breathing often becomes progressively difficult. The disorder occurs in different forms, ranging from mild to severe, and can affect individuals of any age. PAP may occur secondary to many environmental exposures or underlying diseases. However, most cases of PAP occur for no known reason (idiopathic or primary PAP). An extremely rare form of PAP occurs in newborns (congenital PAP).

Organizations related to Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
  • American Lung Association
    61 Broadway, 6th Floor
    New York NY 10006
    Phone #: 212-315-8700
    800 #: 800-586-4872
    e-mail: N/A
    Home page: http://www.lungusa.org
  • British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease (BPOLD)
    None
    None None None
    Phone #: N/A
    800 #: N/A
    e-mail: N/A
    Home page: http://www.bpold.co.uk
  • NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Information Center
    P.O. Box 30105
    Bethesda MD 20824-0105
    Phone #: 301-592-8573
    800 #: --
    e-mail: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
    Home page: N/A



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html