Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Rh Disease


Synonyms of Rh Disease
  • Congenital Anemia of Newborn
  • Erythroblastosis Fetalis
  • Erythroblastosis Neonatorum
  • Hemolytic Anemia of Newborn
  • Hemolytic Disease of Newborn
  • Icterus Gravis Neonatorum
  • Rhesus Incompatibility
  • Rh Factor Incompatibility
  • Rh Incompatibility

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Rh disease or Rh incompatibility (also known as erythroblastosis fetalis) occurs when a woman with Rh-negative blood conceives a child with Rh-positive blood. Red blood cells are destroyed (hemolysis) because of this incompatibility, leading to anemia and other symptoms in the infant. Symptoms vary in severity among affected infants and may include an unusual yellowish coloration of the skin (jaundice); swelling of the chest and abdomen due to the accumulation of fluid (edema); and/or a pale appearance of the skin. In more severe cases, affected infants may have experience life-threatening complications. Rh disease occurs only when a mother?s blood is Rh-negative and her baby?s blood is Rh-positive.

    Organizations related to Rh Disease
    • NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Information Center
      P.O. Box 30105
      Bethesda MD 20824-0105
      Phone #: 301-592-8573
      800 #: --
      e-mail: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
      Home page: N/A
    • National Perinatal Association
      3500 East Fletcher Avenue
      Tampa FL 33613
      Phone #: 813-971-1008
      800 #: 888-971-3295
      e-mail: npa@nationalperinatal.org
      Home page: http://www.nationalperinatal.org
    • National Perinatal Information Center
      144 Wayland Avenue
      Providence RI 02906
      Phone #: 401-274-0650
      800 #: --
      e-mail: npic@npic.org
      Home page: http://www.npic.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html