Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Schnitzler Syndrome


Synonyms of Schnitzler Syndrome
  • Schnitzler?s Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • IgG Variant Schnitzler Syndrome


General Discussion
Schnitzler syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by a chronic reddish rash that resembles hives (urticaria) and elevated levels of a specific protein in the blood (monoclonal IgM gammopathy). Symptoms associated with Schnitzler syndrome may include repeated bouts of fever, joint inflammation (arthritis), joint pain (arthralgia), bone pain, and other findings such as enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy). A monoclonal IgM gammopathy refers to the uncontrolled growth of a single clone (monoclonal) of plasma cells, which results in the abnormal accumulation of M-proteins (also known as immunoglobulin M or IgM) in the blood. These proteins are supposed to fight foreign substances in the body such as viruses and bacteria, but researchers suspect that they play a role in the development of Schnitzler syndrome. However, the specific role these proteins play and the exact cause of Schnitzler syndrome is unknown. Schnitzler syndrome is difficult to classify and some researchers have suggested that it is an acquired autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory syndromes are a group of disorders characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation due to an abnormality of the innate immune system. They are not the same as autoimmune disorders, in which the adaptive immune system malfunctions and mistakenly attacks healthy tissue.

Organizations related to Schnitzler Syndrome
  • Madisons Foundation
    PO Box 241956
    Los Angeles CA 90024
    Phone #: 310-264-0826
    800 #: N/A
    e-mail: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
    Home page: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org
  • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
    1 AMS Circle
    Bethesda MD 20892-3675
    Phone #: 301-495-4484
    800 #: 877-226-4267
    e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
    Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html