Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Split Hand/Split Foot Malformation


Synonyms of Split Hand/Split Foot Malformation
  • Ectrodactilia of the Hand
  • Ectrodactyly
  • Ektrodactyly of the Hand
  • Karsch-Neugebauer Syndrome
  • Lobster Claw Deformity
  • Split-Hand/Foot Deformity
  • Split-Hand/Foot Malformation
  • Split Hand Malformation

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Split hand/split foot malformation (SHFM) is a genetic disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of some fingers or toes, often combined with clefts in the hands or feet. There may also be the appearance of webbing between fingers or toes (syndactyly). This may give the hands and/or feet a claw-like appearance.

    There are many types and combinations of deformities that appear in split hand/split foot malformation. They range widely in severity, even in members of the same family. The malformation may occur alone, or it may occur as a component of a syndrome with other characteristics.

    Organizations related to Split Hand/Split Foot Malformation
    • Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
      PO Box 8126
      Gaithersburg MD 20898-8126
      Phone #: 301-519-3194
      800 #: 888-205-2311
      e-mail: gardinfo@nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.genome.gov/10000409
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      1 AMS Circle
      Bethesda MD 20892-3675
      Phone #: 301-495-4484
      800 #: 877-226-4267
      e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html