Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Syphilis, Acquired


Synonyms of Syphilis, Acquired
  • Lues, Acquired
  • Venereal Disease

Disorder Subdivisions

  • Neurosyphilis


General Discussion
Syphilis is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium (microorganism) treponema pallidum. It is transmitted by direct contact with an infected lesion, usually through sexual intercourse. When untreated, syphilis progresses through primary, secondary and latent stages. The early stages of syphilis may not have any detectable symptoms. In some cases, symptoms can remain dormant for years. Eventually any tissue or vascular organ in the body may be affected.

Syphilis may also be acquired by the fetus in the uterus (congenital syphilis). Syphilis, especially when detected early, may be cured with appropriate treatment.

Organizations related to Syphilis, Acquired
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Road NE
    Atlanta GA 30333
    Phone #: 404-639-3534
    800 #: 800-311-3435
    e-mail: http://www.cdc.gov/netinfo.htm
    Home page: http://www.cdc.gov/
  • NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
    6610 Rockledge Drive
    Bethesda MD 20892-6612
    Phone #: 301-496-5717
    800 #: --
    e-mail: N/A
    Home page: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/
  • Sexuality Information and Education Council of the U.S.
    130 West 42nd Street
    New York NY 10036-7802
    Phone #: 212-819-9770
    800 #: --
    e-mail: siecus@siecus.org
    Home page: http://www.siecus.org
  • World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for the Americas (AMRO)
    Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
    Washington DC 20037
    Phone #: 202-974-3000
    800 #: --
    e-mail: postmaster@paho.org
    Home page: http://www.who.ch/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html