Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome


Synonyms of Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
  • Gasser Syndrome
  • HUS

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (HUS) is a very rare disorder that primarily affects young children between the ages of one and 10 years, particularly those under the age of four years. In many cases, the onset of HUS is preceded by a flu-like illness (gastroenteritis) characterized by vomiting, abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea, which, in some cases, may be bloody. Symptoms of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome usually become apparent three to 10 days after the development of gastroenteritis and may include sudden paleness (pallor), irritability, weakness, lack of energy (lethargy), and/or excretion of abnormally diminished amounts of urine (oliguria). The disease typically progresses to include inability of the kidneys to process waste products from the blood and excrete them into the urine (acute renal failure); a decrease in circulating red blood cells (microangiopathic hemolytic anemia); a decrease in circulating blood platelets, which assist in blood clotting functions (thrombocytopenia); and the abnormal accumulation of platelets within certain blood vessels (microthrombi), reducing the blood flow to several organs (e.g., kidneys, pancreas, brain) potentially leading to multiple organ dysfunction or failure. In some cases, neurological problems may be present at the onset of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome or may occur at any time during the disorder's progression. Neurological symptoms may include dizziness, seizures (partial or generalized), disorientation or confusion, and/or loss of consciousness (coma). The onset of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome is most frequently associated with infection by a particular strain (O157:H7) of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium. Occasionally, adults may be affected by Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.
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    Organizations related to Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
    • American Kidney Fund, Inc.
      6110 Executive Boulevard
      Rockville MD 20852
      Phone #: 301-881-3052
      800 #: 800-638-8299
      e-mail: helpline@kideyfund.org
      Home page: http://www.kidneyfund.org
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      6610 Rockledge Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-6612
      Phone #: 301-496-5717
      800 #: --
      e-mail: N/A
      Home page: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/
    • NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
      Endocrine Diseases Metabolic Diseases Branch
      Bethesda MD 20892-3570
      Phone #: 301-654-3810
      800 #: --
      e-mail: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niddk.nih.gov
    • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
      31 Center Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-2540
      Phone #: 301-496-5751
      800 #: 800-352-9424
      e-mail: braininfo@ninds.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/
    • National Kidney Foundation
      30 East 33rd Street
      New York NY 10016
      Phone #: 212-889-2210
      800 #: 800-622-9010
      e-mail: info@kidney.org
      Home page: http://www.kidney.org
    • World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for the Americas (AMRO)
      Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
      Washington DC 20037
      Phone #: 202-974-3000
      800 #: --
      e-mail: postmaster@paho.org
      Home page: http://www.who.ch/



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html