Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis


Synonyms of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis
  • Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis
  • DISH
  • Forestier's Disease
  • Spinal Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis
  • Spinal DISH
  • Vertebral Ankylosing Hyperostosis

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier?s disease, affects the ligaments around the spine. Sections of the ligaments turn into bone in this disorder, which is considered to be a form of degenerative arthritis.

    The conversion of ligamental tissue to bone usually extends along the sides of the vertebrae of the spine. (This may be called flowing calcification.) Also, DISH is associated with inflammation (tendinitis) and calcification of the tendons, especially at the points at which the tendon attaches to the bones. When this happens, the patient is said to have developed bone spurs, especially in the heel and ankles (heel spurs).

    DISH affects three or more vertebrae that are most often located in the chest or in the spine between the chest and pelvis. It is a disorder of older patients, more often affecting men than women ages 50-60. The disorder is often found in association with diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and obesity.
    .

    Organizations related to Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis
    • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      1 AMS Circle
      Bethesda MD 20892-3675
      Phone #: 301-495-4484
      800 #: 877-226-4267
      e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html