Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy


Synonyms of Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • hereditary OPCA
    • sporadic OPCA


    General Discussion
    The term olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) has historically been used to describe a group of disorders that affect the central nervous system and are termed neurodegenerative diseases because they result in a progressive deterioration of nerve cells in certain parts of the brain. These conditions are characterized by progressive balance problems (disequilibrium), progressive impairment of the ability to coordinate voluntary movements (cerebellar ataxia), and difficulty speaking or slurred speech (dysarthria).

    OPCA has been classified based on clinical, genetic, and neuropathological findings and there is significant controversy and confusion in the medical literature because of its association with two distinct groups of disorders, specifically multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Hereditary OPCA usually refers to the group of disorders that overlap with SCA. These conditions are discussed in detail in the NORD report on autosomal dominant hereditary ataxias. Sporadic OPCA refers to the group of disorders for which there is not yet evidence of a hereditary component. Some individuals with sporadic OPCA will develop MSA and this disorder is discussed in detail in the NORD report on MSA. In addition, there are rare types of OPCA that follow autosomal recessive inheritance including Fickler-Winkler type OPCA and the pontocerebellar hypoplasia conditons. One type of SCA follows X-linked inheritance. Currently, neurologists usually use the term OPCA as a preliminary diagnosis until a more specific diagnosis can be made with genetic testing or by ruling out other conditions.

    Organizations related to Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
      1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
      White Plains NY 10605
      Phone #: 914-428-7100
      800 #: 888-663-4637
      e-mail: Askus@marchofdimes.com
      Home page: http://www.marchofdimes.com
    • National Ataxia Foundation
      2600 Fernbrook Lane n, Suite 119
      Minneapolis MN 55447-4752
      Phone #: 763-553-0020
      800 #: --
      e-mail: naf@ataxia.org
      Home page: http://www.ataxia.org
    • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
      31 Center Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-2540
      Phone #: 301-496-5751
      800 #: 800-352-9424
      e-mail: braininfo@ninds.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/
    • National Parkinson Foundation, Inc.
      1501 NW 9th Ave/Bob Hope Road
      Miami FL 33136-1494
      Phone #: 305-243-6666
      800 #: 800-327-4545
      e-mail: contact@parkinson.org
      Home page: http://www.parkinson.org
    • WE MOVE (Worldwide Education and Awareness for Movement Disorders)
      204 West 84th Street
      New York NY 10024
      Phone #: 212-875-8312
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: wemove@wemove.org
      Home page: http://www.wemove.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html