Diseases & Conditions


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Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia (POH)


Synonyms of Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia (POH)
  • POH

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is an extremely rare disorder characterized by abnormal development of bone in areas of the body where bone is not normally present (heterotopic ossification). The disorder first appears as areas of patchy bone formation (ossification) on the skin during infancy; heterotopic ossification progresses to involve superficial and deep connective tissues, areas of fat beneath the skin (subcutaneous fat), muscles, tendons, ligaments, and the bands of fibrous tissues that support muscle (fascia). This abnormal formation of bone may restrict the movement of affected joints and/or hinder the growth of affected limbs. The course of the disease is unpredictable; some areas of the body may become severely affected while others may remain unaffected.

    Organizations related to Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia (POH)
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      1 AMS Circle
      Bethesda MD 20892-3675
      Phone #: 301-495-4484
      800 #: 877-226-4267
      e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info
    • Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia Association
      33 Stonehearth Square
      Indian Head Park IL 60525
      Phone #: 708-246-9410
      800 #: --
      e-mail: poha@comcast.net
      Home page: http://www.pohdisease.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html