Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures


Synonyms of Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures
  • No synonyms found

Disorder Subdivisions

  • No synonyms found


General Discussion
Pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) is a rare cause of stubborn, difficult to control, (intractable) neonatal seizures, of which more than 100 cases have now been reported in the medical literature. PDS presents in a variety of forms with variable signs and symptoms (phenotypically heterogeneous). The one clinical feature characteristic of all patients with PDS is intractable seizures that are not controlled with anticonvulsants but which do respond both clinically and on EEG (electroencephalographically) to large daily supplements of pyridoxine. These patients are not pyridoxine-deficient. They are metabolically dependent on the vitamin. In other words, without supplemental pyridoxine, the patient?s blood level of pyridoxine is normal but the patient will experience seizures. With supplemental pyridoxine, the patient?s pyridoxine blood is normal or elevated, but the patient will not experience seizures. Pyridoxine therapy will be required for life.
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Organizations related to Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures
  • American Epilepsy Society
    342 North Main Street
    West Hartford CT 06117-2507
    Phone #: 860-586-7505
    800 #: --
    e-mail: info@AESnet.org
    Home page: http://www.AESnet.org
  • Epilepsy Foundation
    4351 Garden City Drive
    Landover MD 20785
    Phone #: 301-459-3700
    800 #: 800-332-1000
    e-mail: postmaster@efa.org
    Home page: http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org
  • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
    150 Custer Court
    Green Bay WI 54301-1243
    Phone #: 920-336-5333
    800 #: 877-336-5333
    e-mail: mums@netnet.net
    Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html