Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Stevens Johnson Syndrome


Synonyms of Stevens Johnson Syndrome
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson Type
  • Ectodermosis Erosiva Pluriorificialis
  • Erythema Multiforme Exudativum
  • Erythema Polymorphe, Stevens Johnson Type
  • Febrile Mucocutaneous Syndrome, Stevens Johnson Type
  • Herpes Iris, Stevens-Johnson Type
  • Johnson-Stevens Disease

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Until recently the relationship of Stevens-Johnson syndrome to other severe blistering disorders was a matter of some debate. Now a consensus seems to be evolving that describes SJS as a rare disorder involving lesions of the mucous membranes along with small blisters on the reddish or purplish, flat, thickened patches of skin. As a result, SJS is now distinguished as a separate disorder from erythema multiforme major (EMM). SJS is now considered to be a less severe variant of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN).

    SJS and TEN appear to be characterized by identical clinical signs and symptoms, identical treatment approach and identical prognosis. Patients diagnosed with TEN can present with symptoms ranging from 10% skin involvement and severe threat to the patient?s sight to a presentation involving 90% of the skin but only a modest threat to the patient?s sight.

    SJS (and TEN) is an inflammatory disorder of the skin triggered by an allergic reaction to certain drugs including antibiotics, such as some sulfonamides, tetracycline, amoxicillin, and ampicillin. In some cases, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and anticonvulsants, such as Tegretol and phenobarbital have also been implicated. Over-the-counter medications may act as triggers as well. In some cases, it is also possible that the disorder may be traced to a reaction to an infection.

    One report suggests that the term SJS be limited to cases in which less than 10% of the total body surface area is involved. The authors suggest that the term TEN be limited to cases in which 30% or more of the total body surface area is involved. The term SJS/TEN Overlap is used to describe patients in whom between 10-30% of the total body surface area involved.
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    Organizations related to Stevens Johnson Syndrome
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • Madisons Foundation
      PO Box 241956
      Los Angeles CA 90024
      Phone #: 310-264-0826
      800 #: N/A
      e-mail: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
      Home page: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org
    • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      1 AMS Circle
      Bethesda MD 20892-3675
      Phone #: 301-495-4484
      800 #: 877-226-4267
      e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info
    • NIH/National Eye Institute
      Building 31 Rm 6A32
      Bethesda MD 20892-2510
      Phone #: 301-496-5248
      800 #: --
      e-mail: 2020@nei.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.nei.nih.gov/
    • NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      6610 Rockledge Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-6612
      Phone #: 301-496-5717
      800 #: --
      e-mail: N/A
      Home page: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/
    • Stevens Johnson Syndrome Foundation and Support Group
      PO Box 350333
      Westminster CO 80035-0333
      Phone #: 303-635-1241
      800 #: --
      e-mail: sjsupport@aol.com
      Home page: http://www.sjsupport.org



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html