Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Thalamic Syndrome (Dejerine Roussy)


Synonyms of Thalamic Syndrome (Dejerine Roussy)
  • Central Pain Syndrome
  • Central Post-Stroke Syndrome
  • Dejerine-Roussy Syndrome
  • Posterior Thalamic Syndrome
  • Retrolenticular Syndrome
  • Thalamic Hyperesthetic Anesthesia
  • Thalamic Pain Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Thalamic Syndrome (Dejerine-Roussy) is a rare neurological disorder in which the body becomes hypersensitive to pain as a result of damage to the thalamus, a part of the brain that affects sensation. The thalamus has been described as the brain?s sensory relay station. Primary symptoms are pain and loss of sensation, usually in the face, arms, and/or legs.

    Pain or discomfort may be felt after being mildly touched or even in the absence of a stimulus. The pain associated with thalamic syndrome may be made worse by exposure to heat or cold and by emotional distress. Sometimes, this may include even such emotions as those brought on by listening to music.
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    Organizations related to Thalamic Syndrome (Dejerine Roussy)
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
      31 Center Drive
      Bethesda MD 20892-2540
      Phone #: 301-496-5751
      800 #: 800-352-9424
      e-mail: braininfo@ninds.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html