Diseases & Conditions


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome


Synonyms of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome
  • autosomal dominant periodic fever with amyloidosis
  • benign autosomal dominant familial periodic fever
  • familial hibernian fever
  • TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome
  • TRAPS

Disorder Subdivisions



    General Discussion
    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder characterized by unexplained periodic episodes or ?attacks? of fever associated with additional symptoms including muscle pain (myalgia), abdominal pain, headaches and skin rashes. The specific symptoms can vary greatly from one person to another. The duration of the characteristic episodes can also vary, lasting anywhere from a couple days to one week to more than one month. Onset is usually during infancy or childhood. TRAPS is caused by mutations of the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) gene that encodes the 55-kDa receptor for TNF.

    Organizations related to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome
    • MUMS (Mothers United for Moral Support, Inc) National Parent-to-Parent Network
      150 Custer Court
      Green Bay WI 54301-1243
      Phone #: 920-336-5333
      800 #: 877-336-5333
      e-mail: mums@netnet.net
      Home page: http://www.netnet.net/mums/
    • NIH/National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Information Clearinghouse
      1 AMS Circle
      Bethesda MD 20892-3675
      Phone #: 301-495-4484
      800 #: 877-226-4267
      e-mail: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
      Home page: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info



    For a Complete Report

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ? (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html